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At Voice Live, our Greatest Communicators Hall of Fame takes to the stage – and you can vote for the winner..

Join us at Voice Live on 19 November in Farringdon, when four communication practitioners will try to convince you that their candidate for greatest communicator is someone who all internal communicators should be inspired by.

But who will come out on top? Here’s a taster of what our presenters think of their selections.

Book now, join us, be inspired – and vote.
 

Advita Patel (pictured), director of Comms Rebel, presents the case for… Michelle Obama

There are not many people who can hold the attention of a room like Michelle Obama. I’ve followed this inspirational woman’s journey for the past 10 years and her storytelling technique is awe-inspiring. I’ve watched a number of her speeches – some of them more than once – and each time her enthusiasm, message and stance never waivers. You can see the passion in her eyes and her composure is faultless. She’s taught me a lot over the years and I’ll be sharing why this woman is my choice for one of the best communicators in history. 

 



Shavaun Glen (pictured), chief communications officer at MIB (Motor Insurers' Bureau), presents the case for… Nelson Mandela

What makes Mandela such a powerful communicator is that he had such conviction and passion. This was already clear in his early years, but even more so when he emerged from prison after 27 years. He recognised just how symbolic his release was, as well as the importance of creating trust among all South Africans, quickly. He believed in a very simple philosophy: “When you speak to a man, it goes to his head. When you speak to a man in his language, it goes to his heart.” Mandela delivered long rousing speeches to the masses and was equally engaging and persuasive on a one-to-one level. I believe that communication professionals can model themselves on someone like Mandela. As I share my observations, I hope the audience will be able to examine his techniques and principles and ask, how can they ignite those characteristics in themselves?

 



Rob Mukherjee (pictured), director of transformation at EveryCloud UK, presents t​​​​​he case for… Anne Sullivan

In 1887, 20-year-old Anne Sullivan first met a six-year-old blind and deaf girl, named Helen Keller. Anne herself had serious sight issues, following many failed eye operations. Anne taught Helen to communicate by manually signinginto her hand. Anne’s efforts were met with disengagement and even violence – as Helen didn’t get the point. Anne simply demanded Helen’s parents give her more time – and eventually she had a breakthrough. Great communicators are not the ones with the great voices – they are the ones who work tirelessly to make sure everyone else has a voice.

 



Andy Williamson (pictured), head of change communications at University of East London, presents the case for… Franklin D Roosevelt

Franklin D Roosevelt had a deep understanding of his audience. He rifled through his channel toolkit and, daring to be different, became an early adopter of radio. With the majority of the newspapers controlled by his opponents, he chose a medium that would allow him to communicate directly with his audience. He inaugurated his innovative series of “fireside chats” eight days after taking office. His tone was reassuring in a time of uncertainty; his message was direct and undistorted. He was able to quell rumours and explain his policies, to get his audience behind the need for change.


Click here for more information on Voice Live and to book your place.

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